Linguistic rivalries: Tamil migrants and Anglo-Franco by Sonia N. Das

By Sonia N. Das

"This e-book weaves jointly anthropological debts of diaspora, state, and empire to discover and examine the multi-faceted strategies of globalization characterizing the migration and social integration reviews of Tamil-speaking immigrants and refugees from India and Sri Lanka to Montréal, Québec within the past due twentieth and early twenty first centuries. In Montréal, a urban with extra trilingual audio system than in any other Read more...

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Linguistic Rivalries weaves jointly anthropological bills of diaspora, state, and empire to discover and learn the multi-faceted approaches of globalization. Read more...

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Linguistic rivalries: Tamil migrants and Anglo-Franco conflicts

"This publication weaves jointly anthropological debts of diaspora, country, and empire to discover and study the multi-faceted methods of globalization characterizing the migration and social integration studies of Tamil-speaking immigrants and refugees from India and Sri Lanka to Montréal, Québec within the overdue twentieth and early twenty first centuries.

Extra info for Linguistic rivalries: Tamil migrants and Anglo-Franco conflicts

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My father comes from a middle-​class Hindu family in the West Bengal town of Malda situated along the international border of India and Bangladesh. Although the District of Malda was divided at the time of Partition in 1947, when my paternal grandfather was growing up, his natal village on the Bangladeshi side was still considered part of British India. Despite being the penniless son of a low-​ caste artisan who died when he was only six, my grandfather was well versed in English, Bengali, and Sanskrit poetry and literature, having won academic scholarships and paying the rest of his way through grade school, university, and law school by tutoring a cousin adopted by a wealthy landowning family.

My father convinced our family to move to the United States after the first referendum in 1980 partly because he did not want my brother and me to attend public schools in French and grow up as francophones. Instead, we settled in a New Jersey suburb of Philadelphia where many of his former college classmates from West Bengal lived. My mother enrolled in English as a Second Language classes at the community center with the wives of other immigrant men from our apartment complex. Even though she had learned English at her Catholic school in Montréal and spoke it well enough with my father, she could not function at full capacity in a monolingual English world.

Most of my aunts and uncles completed their higher education studies in engineering, law, or arts in Malda and Calcutta colleges, where they learned English to varying extents. In 1965, after my grandfather was diagnosed with terminal cancer, my father accepted a job at a civil engineering firm in Calgary and left India with the intention to send remittances to support his mother and siblings. Living in Calgary two years before the Canadian government repealed its anti-​Asian immigration policy, my father recollects being one of the first Indians in this city.

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